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3 edition of influence of the native language on the perception of vowel quality found in the catalog.

influence of the native language on the perception of vowel quality

Andrew Butcher

influence of the native language on the perception of vowel quality

by Andrew Butcher

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  • 7 Currently reading

Published by Institut für Phonetik, Universität Kiel in Kiel .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Auditory perception.,
  • Vowels.,
  • Psycholinguistics -- Cross-cultural studies.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 122-131.

    StatementAndrew Butcher.
    SeriesArbeitsberichte - Institut für Phonetik, Universität Kiel ;, nr. 6, Arbeitsberichte (Universität Kiel. Institut für Phonetik) ;, Nr. 6.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBF251 .B8
    The Physical Object
    Pagination137 p. :
    Number of Pages137
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3895270M
    LC Control Number81457135

    understand a second language (L2) in a native-like manner1 (Munro, Flege, & MacKay, ). One of the most salient factors influencing the outcome of child and adult L2 learning is the effect of the leamer's native language (Ll) on the ability to learn L2 consonants and vowels (or "sounds" for short). Adult L2. 1. Cross-language speech perception and production It is widely acknowledged that second/foreign language (L2) speech learn-ing is a challenge to adult learners in terms of articulation and percep-tion of non-native phonetic contrasts, that is, L2 speech sounds that do not exist in the native language (L1) or are not phonologically distinctiveAuthor: Anabela Rato, Andréia Schurt Rauber, Letícia Piske Soares, Liane Regio Lucas.

      Recent acoustic descriptions have shown that Spanish and Portuguese vowels are produced differently in Europe and Latin America. The present study investigates whether comparable between-variety differences exist in vowel perception. Spanish, Peruvian, Portuguese, and Brazilian listeners were tested in a vowel identification task with stimuli sampled from the whole vowel Cited by: 9. THE PERCEPTION OF ENGLISH VOWELS BY NATIVE SPANISH SPEAKERS by Andrew R. Jeske B.A. Linguistics, UW-Madison, B.A. Spanish, UW-Madison, MA, University of Pittsburgh, Submitted to the Graduate Faculty of Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts.

    1. Introduction. The term linguistic experience has been widely used in accounts of how perceptual performance with non-native speech categories is influenced by the listener's native language (L1). While most previous studies have reported L1 influence on speech perception at the segmental level, its impact on listeners' speech perception at the suprasegmental level is Cited by: Previous study by Dupoux et al. () has revealed that Japanese native speakers are more likely to perceive an ‘illusory vowel’ between two consonants even if no vowels are inserted. This is due to the difference in the phonotactic structure of French and : Hinako Masuda, Takayuki Arai.


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Influence of the native language on the perception of vowel quality by Andrew Butcher Download PDF EPUB FB2

Speakers and native English speakers in their perception of English vowel categories by combining metalinguistic perceptual similarity judgments with online, graded measurements of the speech categorization process.

In perceptual similarity judgments, listeners are asked directly how similar they perceive stimuli to be, and these pair-wise. Assuming native-like perception is a prerequisite to native-like production for non-native speech, this study compared the weight Mandarin learners and native speakers of English gave to vowel quality as a cue to English lexical stress in comparison to that given to f0, duration and intensity under natural and flat pitch contour by: One factor worth noting is phonetic context.

For example, previous research has shown that vowel context influences the neighboring sounds not only for native AV perception (e.g., Benguerel & Pichora-Fuller, ; Daniloff & Moll, ) but also for nonnative perception (e.g., Hardison, b).

Since the vowels used in the current study exist in the native phonetic Cited by: This dissertation examines the role of the native dialect in non-native perception and production in the specific case of Cuban and Peninsular Spanish as native varieties and of English vowels /Q, ˆ, A/ as the target.

In most second language studies, the learners’ native variety is assumed to be homogenous, regardless of their regional : Irina Marinescu. Cross-language perception of nonnative vowels: Phonological and phonetic effects of listeners' native languages phonetic influences on perception [4].

Numerous vowel. Cross-language comparison of vowel perception in English-learning and German-learning infants Article (PDF Available) in The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (1).

Cross-language perception of nonnative vowels: Phonological and phonetic effects of listeners’ native languages Catherine T. Best1,2, Pierre Halle3, Ocke-Schwen Bohn4, and Alice Faber2 1 Wesleyan Univ.

(USA), 2 Haskins Labs (USA), 3LPE/CNRS-Paris5 (France), 4Aarhus Univ. (Denmark) E-mail: [email protected], [email protected], [email protected] listener's native language (L1).

A number of different studies have examined the percep- tion of vowels by speakers of different languages. For ex- ample, Stevens et al. () asked American and Swedish listeners to identify the tokens of two synthetic vowel con- tinua: One composed of unfounded vowels ranging from/i/.

Perception of non-native consonant contrasts may be influenced by phonetic, as well as phonological, properties of the listener‟s native language. The impact of both factors on perception of American English /r l w j/ was investigated with native speakers of Danish and.

The influence of the native language in learning a foreign language is certainly indispensable. This influence can be either positive or negative. In order to observe the circumstances under which this influence is positive and/or negative, the following study was conducted in English phonology.

The study describes the phonological analysis of. We investigated whether regional differences in the native language (L1) influence the perception of. second language (L2) sounds. Many cross-language and L2 perception studies have assumed that the degree of acoustic similarity between L1 and L2 sounds predicts cross-linguistic and L2 performance.

These findings confirm that acoustic differences in native vowel production lead to differential L2 vowel perception. Introduction Some Dutch vowel contrasts such as / ɑ-a / and / ɪ-i / pose perceptual problems for Spanish listeners, regardless of their level of general proficiency in the Dutch language, as shown recently in Escudero and Wanrooij () Cited by: However, language experience does not play a significant role in the perception of the less similar vowels [ɹ̪] and [ɻ].

This can be explained by the high markedness of these two phones which delay the influence of L2 experience. The production of Mandarin vowels is assessed with interpretations by NS judges and an acoustic : Wenhui Zhu.

perception of nonnative speech. The target stimuli in studies of experiential influences on speech perception have classically been nonnative minimal distinctions, that is, single phonetic feature contrasts that are linguistically irrelevant in the listener’s native language.

Therefore, perception of minimal contrasts will be our main Size: KB. This study examined the effect of native language background on listeners’ perception of native and non-native vowels spoken by native (Hong Kong Cantonese) and non-native (Mandarin and Australian English) speakers.

They completed discrimination and an identification task with and without visual cues in clear and noisy conditions. Results indicated Author: Connie K. So, Virginie Attina. contrast in the native language would affect the perception of a "foreign" vowel contrast in the second language.

Also relevant, are differences between the phonological status of vowel length in Japanese and Korean, and the implications that may follow for second language learners' perceptions of front vowel contrasts in Australian English.

THE EFFECTS OF EXPERIENCE ON THE PERCEPTION OF GERMAN ROUNDED VOWELS BY NATIVE SPEAKERS OF AMERICAN ENGLISH Bradley Jay York Center for Language Studies Master of Arts This study examines the effects of experience in German on the categorical perception of German rounded vowels, namely /uː/, /ʊ/, /oː/, /ɔ/, /yː/, /ʏ/, /øː/, and Cited by: 2.

influence of the emerging native phonology, which leads to a transient asymmetric pattern in perception. Keywords: vowel length, discrimination, cross-language speech perception, development of speech perception The development of a phonetic system consisting of speech sounds specific to an infant s linguistic environment has been.

Studies such as Iverson and Evans (, ) claim that learners with a larger vowel inventory than the target language should be better able to perceive the L2 contrasts than those whose native vowel inventory is smaller than the target : Jaydene Elvin, Alba Tuninetti, Paola Escudero.

Effects of native language on perception of voice quality. (PMID PMCID:PMC) Mandarin listeners differed from the Gujarati listeners in the influence of spectral slope on JNDs. acoustic studies of Gujarati speakers indicate that H1-H2 is a good indicator of a vowel’s underlying voice quality (Fischer-Jørgensen.

Second Language Linguistic Perception model [Escudero,], and the Native Language Magnet Model [e.g Iverson & Kuhl, ]. In contrast to the vowel perception by Chinese Learners of English (CLE), few studies on consonant perception by CLE The role of native language experience ignoredFile Size: KB.Importantly, it has been shown that a non-native dialect can influence the perceptual assimilation of vowels in a non-native language.

According to the L2LP model, this knowledge of vowels in native and non-native dialects reflects listeners' speech environments which may be wider than one particular by: 5.Language-specific constraints appear by 10–12 months.

Evidence presented here suggests that mature listeners’ discrimination is constrained by perceived similarities between non-native sounds and native categories, and that this native language influence may not be fully developed at 10–12 by: